Dixie Wing Peachtree City, GA

Address:
1200 Echo Ct
Peachtree City, GA 30269

Contact number:
(678) 364-1110

Website:
http://www.dixiewing.org/

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  • The Dixie Wing of the CAF was granted a Provisional Charter on February 28, 1987, and a Wing Charter No. 48 on January 30, 1989. It has since displayed its collection of vintage World War II era aircraft at numerous airshows throughout the Southeast. The wing is a non-profit, tax-exempt "flying museum" that depends on contributions of time and funds to carry out its mission.

    SBD Dauntless Lady in Blue

    The SBD was the only U.S. combat aircraft to fight from the beginning of the World War II until the end. Considered the most destructive air weapon of the U.S. Navy, the SBD sank over 300,000 tons of enemy ships, a greater tonnage of Japanese shipping than any other Allied aircraft during the war! Eighteen were warships, including five aircraft carriers sunk in the battle of the Coral Sea and Midway. It earned the nickname “Slow, But Deadly!” After the war, the U.S. Marine Corps continued to use the SBD, and in the 1950s, the French Air Force used SBDs in its war in Indo-China.

    P-51 Mustang Red Nose

    This was the plane that launched the Confederate Air Force (now Commemorative Air Force). It was acquired by the founding members of the CAF including Loyd P. Nolen himself. This airplane is not only historically significant, but it is thoroughly engrained in the CAF’s heritage as well. The Dixie Wing was selected to become the new home for the P-51 “Red Nose” by the CAF General Staff in November of 2002. We are very proud to have received such an honor and are doing our best to live up to that distinction. Red Nose is painted with the markings of the 334th FS, 4th FG, 8th AF, the pilot was Capt.David W.Howe,January 1945. He flew with 334th FS from 22/9/43 until 30/3/45 when returned... ...

    P-63 Kingcobra

    Of the nine new fighter designs tested by the United States Army Air Force (USAAF) in 1942-43, only one was produced in quantity – the Bell P-63. This aircraft was designed to address the shortcomings of the P-39 Airacobra. Although similar in appearance to the P-39, the P-63 was in fact a completely redesigned airplane and only a few parts are interchangeable between the two aircraft.Our P-63 is currently undergoing a complete restoration and should be flying in 2017. Throughout its life, our P-63 has served many different roles, from test aircraft to air show performer. It was built in the winter of 1944, bearing the Bell construction number 33-11, for model 33, aircraft 11. It... ...

    FG-1D Corsair

    Our corsair was built by Goodyear hence the designation FG instead of F4U. BuNo 92468 (Stands for “Bureau Number” which is the Navy serial number of the airframe) never saw military combat but was used stateside in various roles until being stricken from active duty by the US Navy in 1956. BuNo 92468 was rescued from destruction in 1957 by Ernest Huggins. Ernest only held the corsair for one year when he transferred ownership to Skip Underwood of Tulsa, Oklahoma. Underwood relocated the plane to an airstrip in Buckeye, Arizona where he had a small crop dusting operation and it remained there in storage until sold in 1960 to CAF Hall of Fame member Marvin L. “Lefty” Gardner. In 2001... ...

    FM-2 Wildcat

    PT-19

    Flashback to 1987. The Dixie Wing was young and had no airplanes. Imagine the excitement when we were assigned our first warbird, a Fairchild PT-19 donated to the Commemorative Air Force by Col. Owen E. Stiegelmeir of Berea, Ohio. But, we had some challenges. The aircraft, N9878H, was in a field, under a shed, and had not been flown for some time. Our Dixie Wing maintenance team traveled to Ohio and got the aircraft ready to ferry to Atlanta. On September 14, 1987, Col. C. W. Kemper slicked the little navy blue Cornell onto the runway at South Fulton County Airport, and the Dixie Wing was in the Warbird business.

    SNJ-4

    T-34

    After serving the Dominican Republic Air Force well for many years, N687HV was sold, along with several others, to a civilian owner and was moved to its new home in Florida. There, it sat unused for about 5 years. Although it was now kept in a hangar, its previous life was spent outside in tropical humid weather which took its toll on the airframe in the form of surface corrosion and general neglect. Fortunately for N687HV, it was then donated to the Commemorative Air Force and assigned to their Dixie Wing. The airplane was then brought into airworthiness compliance by a Certified Repair Station with extensive T-34 experience, where they completed the necessary FAA Air Worthiness... ...

    Aeronca L-16

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